McIntyre Drive Traffic Calming

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This project is currently on hold.

McIntyre Drive Traffic Calming

We're bringing traffic calming upgrades to McIntyre Drive to improve road safety!

The City of Whitehorse is working together with the Kwanlin Dün First Nation to bring traffic calming improvements along McIntyre Drive. The purpose of this project is to reduce vehicular speeds and improve safety and comfort for all road users including pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, and drivers.

Background

Over the past number of years, residents of the McIntyre subdivision and citizens of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation have raised concerns about road safety and speeding along McIntyre Drive. Community concerns have centered on excessive speeding, poor lighting, unsafe

We're bringing traffic calming upgrades to McIntyre Drive to improve road safety!

The City of Whitehorse is working together with the Kwanlin Dün First Nation to bring traffic calming improvements along McIntyre Drive. The purpose of this project is to reduce vehicular speeds and improve safety and comfort for all road users including pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, and drivers.

Background

Over the past number of years, residents of the McIntyre subdivision and citizens of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation have raised concerns about road safety and speeding along McIntyre Drive. Community concerns have centered on excessive speeding, poor lighting, unsafe pedestrian crossings, narrow and discontinuous sidewalks, near misses between pedestrians/cyclists and vehicles, and deteriorating infrastructure.

In 2020, the City worked together with the Kwanlin Dün First Nation to conduct planning work for the project. Now, the project is in the detailed design phase and communications and engagement with the broader McIntyre neighbourhood community. The proposed upgrades along the along the corridor include the following:

  • Asphalt resurfacing.
  • Cycle tracks.
  • Drainage.
  • Lighting.
  • Pavement markings and signage.
  • Pedestrian crossings.
  • Traffic calming: chicanes, curb extensions, raised intersections, raised pedestrian crossings, roadway narrowing.
  • Sidewalks.

The proposed upgrades will improve transportation accessibility, connectivity, equity, mobility, safety, and sustainability by:

  • Accessible pedestrian infrastructure to improve transportation mobility for people with disabilities.
  • Dedicated and protected uni-directional cycle tracks on both sides of McIntyre Drive.
  • Enhanced lighting.
  • Improved vehicular sightlines.
  • Improved pedestrian crossings.
  • New sidewalk on outer loop (west side) of McIntyre Drive. Sidewalks on both sides of McIntyre Drive.
  • Reduced pedestrian/cycling crossing distances.
  • Reduced vehicle speeds through traffic calming.
  • Separated sidewalks to separate pedestrians from cycling and vehicle traffic.
  • Upgraded street infrastructure: resurfacing, line painting, etc.

How to get involved:

  • Ask a question about the project.

Our promise to you:

We will keep you informed, listen to and acknowledge your concerns and preferences, and provide feedback on how public input influenced the decision.

This project is currently on hold.

Do you have a question about the McIntyre Drive Traffic Calming project?

Ask your questions away and a member of the project team will respond as soon as possible.

  • Share This is a great initiative and the conceptual design looks encouraging. From my experience as an keen bicycle commuter, I believe that, in addition to a great concept, details of the final product are extremely important and can make the difference between a successful adoption of the infrastructure and a failed effort. An example of a mostly failed effort is the Hamilton Blvd motorized multi-use trail. Conceptually, the idea was great: provide a trail physically separated from the busy road for users to commute on. The rollout, due to less than ideal attention to detail was the Achille’s heel of the project. Most cyclists choose to brave the traffic on Hamilton Blvd rather than taking the trail. I see the following reasons that contribute to the lack of adoption of the tail by the bicycle commuting community: 1. Unnecessary hills on the trail. While Hamilton Blvd was constructed to minimize hills through cuts and fills, the MMU Trail was built following existing terrain. This requires cyclist to exert more effort and they often choose to ride on the road instead. 2. Allowing recreational motorized vehicles discourages cyclist. Motorized trail users are tempted to speed and often do, increasing the level of stress for non-motorized users. They also fling gravel into the trail creating hazardous surface conditions for cyclists. Hamilton Blvd shoulders are often more debris-free that the trail and cyclist tend to choose the road for this reason. 3. Majority of intersections present cyclists with unpleasant, rough, and dangerous gutters or curbs to cross. 4. One of the things bicycle commuters find annoying and try really hard to avoid is stoping and starting. It take a lot of effort to do so. At all intersections along the Hamilton Blvd trail, it is either unclear whether cars or cyclist have the right of way, or the right of way is explicitly given to cars. In order for the infrastructure to be readily adopted by cyclists, cyclists should have the right of way and signage and other features should clearly indicate to cars that this is the case. With perhaps the exception of the first point (geography is less of an issue on McIntyre Drive), these points will determine how the bicycle and pedestrian sections of this traffic calming project will be adopted by the active transportation community. Are there intentions to reflect on the shortcomings of the Hamilton Blvd MMU trail and to implement appropriate improvements into the design of McIntyre Drive? on Facebook Share This is a great initiative and the conceptual design looks encouraging. From my experience as an keen bicycle commuter, I believe that, in addition to a great concept, details of the final product are extremely important and can make the difference between a successful adoption of the infrastructure and a failed effort. An example of a mostly failed effort is the Hamilton Blvd motorized multi-use trail. Conceptually, the idea was great: provide a trail physically separated from the busy road for users to commute on. The rollout, due to less than ideal attention to detail was the Achille’s heel of the project. Most cyclists choose to brave the traffic on Hamilton Blvd rather than taking the trail. I see the following reasons that contribute to the lack of adoption of the tail by the bicycle commuting community: 1. Unnecessary hills on the trail. While Hamilton Blvd was constructed to minimize hills through cuts and fills, the MMU Trail was built following existing terrain. This requires cyclist to exert more effort and they often choose to ride on the road instead. 2. Allowing recreational motorized vehicles discourages cyclist. Motorized trail users are tempted to speed and often do, increasing the level of stress for non-motorized users. They also fling gravel into the trail creating hazardous surface conditions for cyclists. Hamilton Blvd shoulders are often more debris-free that the trail and cyclist tend to choose the road for this reason. 3. Majority of intersections present cyclists with unpleasant, rough, and dangerous gutters or curbs to cross. 4. One of the things bicycle commuters find annoying and try really hard to avoid is stoping and starting. It take a lot of effort to do so. At all intersections along the Hamilton Blvd trail, it is either unclear whether cars or cyclist have the right of way, or the right of way is explicitly given to cars. In order for the infrastructure to be readily adopted by cyclists, cyclists should have the right of way and signage and other features should clearly indicate to cars that this is the case. With perhaps the exception of the first point (geography is less of an issue on McIntyre Drive), these points will determine how the bicycle and pedestrian sections of this traffic calming project will be adopted by the active transportation community. Are there intentions to reflect on the shortcomings of the Hamilton Blvd MMU trail and to implement appropriate improvements into the design of McIntyre Drive? on Twitter Share This is a great initiative and the conceptual design looks encouraging. From my experience as an keen bicycle commuter, I believe that, in addition to a great concept, details of the final product are extremely important and can make the difference between a successful adoption of the infrastructure and a failed effort. An example of a mostly failed effort is the Hamilton Blvd motorized multi-use trail. Conceptually, the idea was great: provide a trail physically separated from the busy road for users to commute on. The rollout, due to less than ideal attention to detail was the Achille’s heel of the project. Most cyclists choose to brave the traffic on Hamilton Blvd rather than taking the trail. I see the following reasons that contribute to the lack of adoption of the tail by the bicycle commuting community: 1. Unnecessary hills on the trail. While Hamilton Blvd was constructed to minimize hills through cuts and fills, the MMU Trail was built following existing terrain. This requires cyclist to exert more effort and they often choose to ride on the road instead. 2. Allowing recreational motorized vehicles discourages cyclist. Motorized trail users are tempted to speed and often do, increasing the level of stress for non-motorized users. They also fling gravel into the trail creating hazardous surface conditions for cyclists. Hamilton Blvd shoulders are often more debris-free that the trail and cyclist tend to choose the road for this reason. 3. Majority of intersections present cyclists with unpleasant, rough, and dangerous gutters or curbs to cross. 4. One of the things bicycle commuters find annoying and try really hard to avoid is stoping and starting. It take a lot of effort to do so. At all intersections along the Hamilton Blvd trail, it is either unclear whether cars or cyclist have the right of way, or the right of way is explicitly given to cars. In order for the infrastructure to be readily adopted by cyclists, cyclists should have the right of way and signage and other features should clearly indicate to cars that this is the case. With perhaps the exception of the first point (geography is less of an issue on McIntyre Drive), these points will determine how the bicycle and pedestrian sections of this traffic calming project will be adopted by the active transportation community. Are there intentions to reflect on the shortcomings of the Hamilton Blvd MMU trail and to implement appropriate improvements into the design of McIntyre Drive? on Linkedin Email This is a great initiative and the conceptual design looks encouraging. From my experience as an keen bicycle commuter, I believe that, in addition to a great concept, details of the final product are extremely important and can make the difference between a successful adoption of the infrastructure and a failed effort. An example of a mostly failed effort is the Hamilton Blvd motorized multi-use trail. Conceptually, the idea was great: provide a trail physically separated from the busy road for users to commute on. The rollout, due to less than ideal attention to detail was the Achille’s heel of the project. Most cyclists choose to brave the traffic on Hamilton Blvd rather than taking the trail. I see the following reasons that contribute to the lack of adoption of the tail by the bicycle commuting community: 1. Unnecessary hills on the trail. While Hamilton Blvd was constructed to minimize hills through cuts and fills, the MMU Trail was built following existing terrain. This requires cyclist to exert more effort and they often choose to ride on the road instead. 2. Allowing recreational motorized vehicles discourages cyclist. Motorized trail users are tempted to speed and often do, increasing the level of stress for non-motorized users. They also fling gravel into the trail creating hazardous surface conditions for cyclists. Hamilton Blvd shoulders are often more debris-free that the trail and cyclist tend to choose the road for this reason. 3. Majority of intersections present cyclists with unpleasant, rough, and dangerous gutters or curbs to cross. 4. One of the things bicycle commuters find annoying and try really hard to avoid is stoping and starting. It take a lot of effort to do so. At all intersections along the Hamilton Blvd trail, it is either unclear whether cars or cyclist have the right of way, or the right of way is explicitly given to cars. In order for the infrastructure to be readily adopted by cyclists, cyclists should have the right of way and signage and other features should clearly indicate to cars that this is the case. With perhaps the exception of the first point (geography is less of an issue on McIntyre Drive), these points will determine how the bicycle and pedestrian sections of this traffic calming project will be adopted by the active transportation community. Are there intentions to reflect on the shortcomings of the Hamilton Blvd MMU trail and to implement appropriate improvements into the design of McIntyre Drive? link

    This is a great initiative and the conceptual design looks encouraging. From my experience as an keen bicycle commuter, I believe that, in addition to a great concept, details of the final product are extremely important and can make the difference between a successful adoption of the infrastructure and a failed effort. An example of a mostly failed effort is the Hamilton Blvd motorized multi-use trail. Conceptually, the idea was great: provide a trail physically separated from the busy road for users to commute on. The rollout, due to less than ideal attention to detail was the Achille’s heel of the project. Most cyclists choose to brave the traffic on Hamilton Blvd rather than taking the trail. I see the following reasons that contribute to the lack of adoption of the tail by the bicycle commuting community: 1. Unnecessary hills on the trail. While Hamilton Blvd was constructed to minimize hills through cuts and fills, the MMU Trail was built following existing terrain. This requires cyclist to exert more effort and they often choose to ride on the road instead. 2. Allowing recreational motorized vehicles discourages cyclist. Motorized trail users are tempted to speed and often do, increasing the level of stress for non-motorized users. They also fling gravel into the trail creating hazardous surface conditions for cyclists. Hamilton Blvd shoulders are often more debris-free that the trail and cyclist tend to choose the road for this reason. 3. Majority of intersections present cyclists with unpleasant, rough, and dangerous gutters or curbs to cross. 4. One of the things bicycle commuters find annoying and try really hard to avoid is stoping and starting. It take a lot of effort to do so. At all intersections along the Hamilton Blvd trail, it is either unclear whether cars or cyclist have the right of way, or the right of way is explicitly given to cars. In order for the infrastructure to be readily adopted by cyclists, cyclists should have the right of way and signage and other features should clearly indicate to cars that this is the case. With perhaps the exception of the first point (geography is less of an issue on McIntyre Drive), these points will determine how the bicycle and pedestrian sections of this traffic calming project will be adopted by the active transportation community. Are there intentions to reflect on the shortcomings of the Hamilton Blvd MMU trail and to implement appropriate improvements into the design of McIntyre Drive?

    Richard Legner asked about 2 years ago

    Hi Richard Legner,

    Thank you for sharing your anecdotal observations and comments about safety and active transportation of the Hamilton Boulevard Motorized Multi-Use Pathway.

    I interpret your question as follows:
    Will this project (McIntyre Drive Traffic Calming) include improvements to the Hamilton Boulevard Motorized Multi-Use Pathway crossings at the Hamilton Boulevard & McIntyre Drive (north) intersection and Hamilton Boulevard & McIntyre Drive (south) intersection to address safety and active transportation concerns that you have described?

    The City may undertake some minor improvements to the multi-use pathway crossings, but only as far as required to reasonably integrate the proposed works and adjacent existing infrastructure. This means that the City will not be undertaking comprehensive intersection improvements to either intersection as a part of this project. The rationale for this is as follows:

    • Addressing the full suite of traffic and safety concerns for the Hamilton Boulevard Motorized Multi Use Pathway, and other issues, needs to be looked at from a Hamilton Boulevard corridor perspective rather than the perspective of the McIntyre Drive Traffic Calming project. A lot of the issues that need to be addressed require extensive analysis from both a safety and traffic perspective for all road users. Also, a lot of the issues depend largely on the design of intersections and the Hamilton Boulevard corridor rather than the design of McIntyre Drive.
    • The City does not have the approved scope, time, and budget to address all the full suite of safety concerns at either intersection. We will do our best to consider improvements to address some of the safety issues and concerns, particularly at the Hamilton Boulevard & McIntyre Drive (north) intersection, however these need to be carefully weighed against project objectives, approved scope, time, and budget, and impacts to Hamilton Boulevard. At minimum, we will ensure that proposed infrastructure reasonably integrates with existing infrastructure. At most, we may consider some minor improvements to existing infrastructure to reasonably integrate with the proposed works and conform to our approved scope, time, and budget.


    The City is currently considering ideas for future capital projects until the end this month. We think that you have some great ideas that could be considered for a future capital project. I encourage you to submit your idea (and any other ideas you have) for our coming capital and operating budget. Please see the following link Capital and Operating Budget | Engage Whitehorse to submit your idea.

    https://www.engagewhitehorse.ca/budgetideas

    Cheers,

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T. | Engineering Services

  • Share when will this happen for riverdale. on Facebook Share when will this happen for riverdale. on Twitter Share when will this happen for riverdale. on Linkedin Email when will this happen for riverdale. link

    when will this happen for riverdale.

    darren asked about 2 years ago

    Hi darren,

    Thanks for the idea. This project focuses specifically on McIntyre Drive.

    The City can consider traffic calming upgrades in Riverdale for a future potential project. I encourage you to submit your idea (and any other ideas) for our coming capital and operating budget. Please see the following link Capital and Operating Budget | Engage Whitehorse to submit your idea.

    https://www.engagewhitehorse.ca/budgetideas

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T. | Engineering Services