Transportation Master Plan

Share Transportation Master Plan on Facebook Share Transportation Master Plan on Twitter Share Transportation Master Plan on Linkedin Email Transportation Master Plan link

The Whitehorse Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is our long-term vision and strategy for transportation decision-making and investment over the next 20 years. The Transportation Master Plan guides how people and goods move around our city and sets our vision and priorities as a community in shaping a multi-modal transportation network. The TMP sets the direction for a vibrant city where people, goods, and places are conveniently connected by diverse transportation options and works towards developing a safe, equitable, and sustainable transportation network for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons.




Whitehorse has grown into a city of over 30,000 people. Over

The Whitehorse Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is our long-term vision and strategy for transportation decision-making and investment over the next 20 years. The Transportation Master Plan guides how people and goods move around our city and sets our vision and priorities as a community in shaping a multi-modal transportation network. The TMP sets the direction for a vibrant city where people, goods, and places are conveniently connected by diverse transportation options and works towards developing a safe, equitable, and sustainable transportation network for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons.




Whitehorse has grown into a city of over 30,000 people. Over the next 20 years Whitehorse is expected to grow to more than 40,000 people. With growth, we need to reevaluate how people and goods move throughout the City.

As we set the vision for our updated Transportation Master Plan, there are important decisions and meaningful discussions to be had as individuals and as a city towards developing and shaping an accessible, equitable, safe, and sustainable transportation network and ultimately a vibrant and livable Whitehorse. Transportation decisions affect us all. How people and goods move affects residents, businesses, and visitors alike whether you walk, cycle, take transit, drive, or ship products or have them delivered. All the choices we make moving forward will require some give and take, compromises, and tradeoffs.

The goal of the Whitehorse Transportation Master Plan is to establish our vision and priorities as a community in shaping a multi-modal transportation network through 2040. The plan aims to guide the City's strategic investment in transportation infrastructure and services across Whitehorse through 2040 with the goal of working towards an accessible, safe, equitable, and sustainable multi-modal transportation network.

Background

The City completed a major review of its transportation network with the completion of a 1992 Citywide Traffic Study and the subsequent 2004 City-Wide Transportation Study. The City had implemented many changes and new initiatives between the two large studies that fall under the broader category of general transportation issues. Accordingly, the 2004 study was progressive, for its time, in achieving a balanced multi-modal approach to the planning of the network. Alternative modes of transportation were considered and given more weight in the decision-making process than ever before through the identification and creation of pedestrian, cycling, and transit routes through the City, thus maintaining and enhancing the quality of life for Whitehorse citizens.

The City is responsible for all the roadways within the city boundaries, with the exception of the Alaska Highway and the North Klondike Highway, which are managed by the Government of Yukon - Department of Highways and Public Works. A number of significant studies and tasks are in progress or have been completed since the 2004 City-Wide Transportation Study. These include the following: The Transportation Demand Management Plan (2015), the Bicycle Network Plan (2018); Transit Master Plan (2018); Trail Plan (2020), numerous Area Development Studies; several new traffic signals; downtown parking studies; the development of the Whistle Bend subdivision; a new City Operations Building; plans for a new downtown City Services Building; and rapid development across the City. The City is currently developing studies that relate to the Transportation Master Plan, which are the Whitehorse 2040 Official Community Plan and the Transit Route Modernization Study. The Transportation Master Plan will build and integrate with these previous and existing planning processes and provided a unified and holistic approach for how we develop our transportation network.

Questions and Answers

Do you have a question about the Whitehorse Transportation Master Plan project? Do you have a question about this round of public engagement? Do you have a question about the Whitehorse transportation network in general?

Our project team is made up of a diverse group of civil and transportation engineers, urban planners, and engagement specialists who are ready to answer all kinds of questions you might have.

Ask your questions away and a member of the project team will respond as soon as possible.

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Share I cannot complete the survey as in several of the questions, I do not like any of the options so no ranking and no ranking means non of my other answers are of any value to you. I'm INSULTED. on Facebook Share I cannot complete the survey as in several of the questions, I do not like any of the options so no ranking and no ranking means non of my other answers are of any value to you. I'm INSULTED. on Twitter Share I cannot complete the survey as in several of the questions, I do not like any of the options so no ranking and no ranking means non of my other answers are of any value to you. I'm INSULTED. on Linkedin Email I cannot complete the survey as in several of the questions, I do not like any of the options so no ranking and no ranking means non of my other answers are of any value to you. I'm INSULTED. link

    I cannot complete the survey as in several of the questions, I do not like any of the options so no ranking and no ranking means non of my other answers are of any value to you. I'm INSULTED.

    MikeB asked 12 months ago

    Hi MikeB,

    Thanks for your comments and interest in the Transportation Master Plan.

    Firstly, we welcome all survey responses. If you don't like the projects, please let us know so that we can take it into account as we develop the draft and final plan.

    I'm not sure what your question is exactly, but feel free to post another question if you wish to clarify.

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T.
    Project Manager | Transportation Master Plan
    Engineering Services, City of Whitehorse

  • Share In Survey #2, question #3 we are asked to rate several strategies in order of preference: -Climate action and sustainability -Increasing transportation options for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons -Promote equity and accessibility -Focus on core transportation services -Improve traffic safety What does "core transportation services" refer to? on Facebook Share In Survey #2, question #3 we are asked to rate several strategies in order of preference: -Climate action and sustainability -Increasing transportation options for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons -Promote equity and accessibility -Focus on core transportation services -Improve traffic safety What does "core transportation services" refer to? on Twitter Share In Survey #2, question #3 we are asked to rate several strategies in order of preference: -Climate action and sustainability -Increasing transportation options for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons -Promote equity and accessibility -Focus on core transportation services -Improve traffic safety What does "core transportation services" refer to? on Linkedin Email In Survey #2, question #3 we are asked to rate several strategies in order of preference: -Climate action and sustainability -Increasing transportation options for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons -Promote equity and accessibility -Focus on core transportation services -Improve traffic safety What does "core transportation services" refer to? link

    In Survey #2, question #3 we are asked to rate several strategies in order of preference: -Climate action and sustainability -Increasing transportation options for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons -Promote equity and accessibility -Focus on core transportation services -Improve traffic safety What does "core transportation services" refer to?

    Richard Legner asked 12 months ago

    Hi Richard Legner,

    Thank you for your question and interest in the Transportation Master Plan.

    In Phase 1 Engagement, we heard a lot of feedback from participants that the City should focus on maintaining and improving its existing transportation services before providing additional services and potentially "spreading itself thin." The comments we heard mostly cited fixing existing streets and roads (potholes, general maintenance, pavement condition, street sweeping), improving winter maintenance (snow and ice clearing), and improving transit. As we were summarizing and compiling feedback from Phase 1 Engagement, we referred to this group of comments as "focus on core transportation services."

    Hope this helps,

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T.
    Project Manager | Transportation Master Plan
    Engineering Services | City of Whitehorse

  • Share I got an email: " Are you aware that the City’s plans for 2nd ave. is to widen the sidewalks, eliminate parking on second avenue and reduce the lanes from 4 to 2 for cars and trucks? It is part of Engage Whitehorse. Chuck Tobin of the Whitehorse Star is going to write an article about this." I replied that I don't believe it because that's totally absurd, but am checking with you. on Facebook Share I got an email: " Are you aware that the City’s plans for 2nd ave. is to widen the sidewalks, eliminate parking on second avenue and reduce the lanes from 4 to 2 for cars and trucks? It is part of Engage Whitehorse. Chuck Tobin of the Whitehorse Star is going to write an article about this." I replied that I don't believe it because that's totally absurd, but am checking with you. on Twitter Share I got an email: " Are you aware that the City’s plans for 2nd ave. is to widen the sidewalks, eliminate parking on second avenue and reduce the lanes from 4 to 2 for cars and trucks? It is part of Engage Whitehorse. Chuck Tobin of the Whitehorse Star is going to write an article about this." I replied that I don't believe it because that's totally absurd, but am checking with you. on Linkedin Email I got an email: " Are you aware that the City’s plans for 2nd ave. is to widen the sidewalks, eliminate parking on second avenue and reduce the lanes from 4 to 2 for cars and trucks? It is part of Engage Whitehorse. Chuck Tobin of the Whitehorse Star is going to write an article about this." I replied that I don't believe it because that's totally absurd, but am checking with you. link

    I got an email: " Are you aware that the City’s plans for 2nd ave. is to widen the sidewalks, eliminate parking on second avenue and reduce the lanes from 4 to 2 for cars and trucks? It is part of Engage Whitehorse. Chuck Tobin of the Whitehorse Star is going to write an article about this." I replied that I don't believe it because that's totally absurd, but am checking with you.

    Murray Lunderg asked 12 months ago

    Hi Murray Lundberg,

    Thank you for your question and interest in the Transportation Master Plan.

    Our proposed action is to make 2nd Avenue a great space for all people regardless of how they choose to move around. We also recognize that there are many competing needs and functions for 2nd Avenue such as supporting the local economy, moving people and goods efficiently, traffic safety, accessibility, sustainability, pedestrian connectivity, and creating a welcoming and vibrant Downtown core.

    The City commissioned a study on 2nd Avenue in 2019 and we are largely incorporating the recommendations from that study into our plan moving forward. Click here to learn more about the 2nd Avenue Corridor Study.

    Our proposed action is to reallocate space more effectively and efficiently. Our proposed improvements include the following:

    • Wider sidewalks.
    • Consideration for urban beautification and landscaping.
    • 2 general purpose lanes (one in each direction) at all times. Curb lane alternates between:
      • Transit priority during peak hours. 
      • Parking during off-peak hours.


    I've included a concept of what this could look like (see figures below). It's important to recognize that this is only conceptual in nature and would be refined at later design processes. It's also important to remember that this is the cross section at a typical "mid-block" location. At intersections we will need to change the geometry to accommodate turning movements like left and right turns. 


    I encourage you to fill out the survey and let us know what you think about our proposed strategies and actions.

    Cheers,

    Stefan Baer
    Project Manager | Transportation Master Plan
    Engineering Services | City of Whitehorse 

  • Share I would like to know where I can view the transportation master plan. I have read the Transit plan and the bicycle network plan. I cannot find the Transportation Plan. I sat though one of the webinars and was bored out of my mind. Pace was not a consideration in the one that I watched. I will not watch another. on Facebook Share I would like to know where I can view the transportation master plan. I have read the Transit plan and the bicycle network plan. I cannot find the Transportation Plan. I sat though one of the webinars and was bored out of my mind. Pace was not a consideration in the one that I watched. I will not watch another. on Twitter Share I would like to know where I can view the transportation master plan. I have read the Transit plan and the bicycle network plan. I cannot find the Transportation Plan. I sat though one of the webinars and was bored out of my mind. Pace was not a consideration in the one that I watched. I will not watch another. on Linkedin Email I would like to know where I can view the transportation master plan. I have read the Transit plan and the bicycle network plan. I cannot find the Transportation Plan. I sat though one of the webinars and was bored out of my mind. Pace was not a consideration in the one that I watched. I will not watch another. link

    I would like to know where I can view the transportation master plan. I have read the Transit plan and the bicycle network plan. I cannot find the Transportation Plan. I sat though one of the webinars and was bored out of my mind. Pace was not a consideration in the one that I watched. I will not watch another.

    dave asked about 1 year ago

    Hi dave,

    Thank you for your question. The draft strategies and actions are located within the Survey #2.

    Thanks,

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T.
    Project Manager | Transportation Master Plan
    Engineering Services, City of Whitehorse

  • Share Hi, it is fantastic to see such a large focus on engagment. there must be several ideas brought forward by the public to help with mobility within the city. What are the new ideas gained during the engagement work and which new ideas (brought forward by the public) will be implimented? on Facebook Share Hi, it is fantastic to see such a large focus on engagment. there must be several ideas brought forward by the public to help with mobility within the city. What are the new ideas gained during the engagement work and which new ideas (brought forward by the public) will be implimented? on Twitter Share Hi, it is fantastic to see such a large focus on engagment. there must be several ideas brought forward by the public to help with mobility within the city. What are the new ideas gained during the engagement work and which new ideas (brought forward by the public) will be implimented? on Linkedin Email Hi, it is fantastic to see such a large focus on engagment. there must be several ideas brought forward by the public to help with mobility within the city. What are the new ideas gained during the engagement work and which new ideas (brought forward by the public) will be implimented? link

    Hi, it is fantastic to see such a large focus on engagment. there must be several ideas brought forward by the public to help with mobility within the city. What are the new ideas gained during the engagement work and which new ideas (brought forward by the public) will be implimented?

    bikers101 asked about 1 year ago

    Hi bikers101,

    Thanks for your feedback and questions. This project is very engagement focused as it will set the direction on transportation decisions and investments for the next 20 years. Because it has such large implications for the future of our City, we want to ensure that our proposed plan aligns with the community's vision for transportation.

    I'm not sure if I follow your question completely, but I interpret your question as stated below. If I'm wrong, please feel free to clarify your question by submitting another question in the Q&A tool.

    How was and will feedback gained during public engagement be incorporated and implemented?

    For this project, we are conducting two phases of engagement. 

    • Phase 1 Engagement focused on understanding the issues and opportunities in our transportation network. We compiled an engagement summary report and heard a lot of great ideas from stakeholders, interested parties, and the public. We used this feedback to develop the draft implementation plan.
    • Phase 2 Engagement focuses on sharing the draft implementation plan to the public and understanding how the public feels about the plan and how to prioritize the proposed projects. We will use the input in Phase 2 Engagement to prepare another engagement summary report to be submitted to Council for information. This engagement summary report will inform the prioritization of strategies, actions, and projects in the draft and final Transportation Master Plan that will be adopted by Council.


    It's important to note that the Transportation Master Plan is ultimately a guiding document that will be used to inform implementation. All projects that are actually implemented need to be approved through the City's operating and capital budgeting process approved by Council each year.

    I encourage you to take the watch our recent webinar, take the survey, and consider attending our public open house today to provide your input.

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T.
    Project Manager | Transportation Master Plan
    Engineering Services, City of Whitehorse

  • Share Are the hamiliton Blvd and Falcon round about still in the master plan? I read the Stantec report and recommendations and found the study flawed and conclusions and recommendations will not solve the problem and waste money. on Facebook Share Are the hamiliton Blvd and Falcon round about still in the master plan? I read the Stantec report and recommendations and found the study flawed and conclusions and recommendations will not solve the problem and waste money. on Twitter Share Are the hamiliton Blvd and Falcon round about still in the master plan? I read the Stantec report and recommendations and found the study flawed and conclusions and recommendations will not solve the problem and waste money. on Linkedin Email Are the hamiliton Blvd and Falcon round about still in the master plan? I read the Stantec report and recommendations and found the study flawed and conclusions and recommendations will not solve the problem and waste money. link

    Are the hamiliton Blvd and Falcon round about still in the master plan? I read the Stantec report and recommendations and found the study flawed and conclusions and recommendations will not solve the problem and waste money.

    Tooney asked about 1 year ago

    Hi Tooney,

    Thank you for your question.

    Intersections along Hamilton Boulevard are proposed to be improved including Hamilton Boulevard and Falcon Drive (south). The study identified a roundabout as the preferred treatment to address the safety and traffic issues at this intersection.

    Fore more information, check out the webinar we just hosted last week. Please consider filling out our survey and attending our public open house tomorrow at the KDFN Cultural Centre between 4-6:30.

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T.
    Project Manager | Transportation Master Plan
    Engineering Services, City of Whitehorse

  • Share Hamilton Boulevard is a speed zone from Sumanik Dr. to McIntyre Dr. and beyond [I didn't know this, at least before my accident]. This was reported in the Whitehorse Star newspaper, on Mar. 23, 2022. An RCMP report stated that a total of 55 tickets were issued with two drivers exceeding 100 km/h in the 60 km/h zone. I was unfortunately in a car accident in mid-January on that same stretch of Hamilton Blvd. The reason I think these drivers exhibit these high rates of speed in this location is that there are no visible buildings or houses in the vicinity and it is just like a normal highway where nobody would travel at 60 km/hr. Furthermore, there is no traffic coming in the opposite direction as the boulevard is divided. Pretty tempting if you are in a hurry and nobody is coming from your rear. Think like a speeder. No, the only way you could slow these drivers down is to get really tough with them. Maybe put in a radar site with a photo camera, to ticket the speeders and automatically send them a bill for their infringement, like they do in Vancouver. This may not work here in the Yukon as our license plates are attached to the rear of our vehicle and are not visible due to being covered in snow or mud. If like other provinces and territories they have a front-mounted license plate in the front, this might be possible. Otherwise, put a radar detector which they have done on occasions, to tell the driver what speed they are doing and maybe they might slow down. Again, If not the RCMP could make more effort to increase their presents near this location and set up their trap. It would be a money-maker for sure. With the help of volunteers, the proceeds could go to some local charity. Or the money could go to equipment to support the RCMP's quest to make the roads safer for pedestrians, bicyclers and drivers. There are a lot of XC skiers driving out of the Dog Trail parking lot, as I did, who wish to go North and have to turn right [south] on Hamilton Blvd at McIntyre Dr. We do a U-turn and come back to the stop sign on McIntyre and Hamilton to proceed across to merge with traffic going North on Hamilton. The other option is to do a left-hand turn off of Hamilton in the turning lane going South [this was not available at the time of my accident as it was not plowed out for a number of days by the City's crews due to the high snow fall] and proceed across the boulevard and enter the merging lane going North. This is an extremely dangerous maneuver as the turn is too sharp and you have to back up to make the turn, which I did, resulting in a near-fatal accident with a speeder coming on Hamilton going South. The best way to solve this too-sharp of a turn is to eliminate the left-hand turning lane altogether, going South on Hamilton. This would force drivers to not attempt this dangerous route which was one of the causes of my accident. The other was the pile-up of snow on the intersection by the City's snow removal equipment which blocked the view for drivers altogether. I was told by my daughter and skiers, this excess snow was not removed for four days after my accident. Are there any thoughts about improving this intersection ? I have heard eventually it will become a normal intersection with traffic lights when housing lots are opened up across the boulevard. I have suggested to the Whitehorse XC Ski Club, which I am a member, that they should approach the City of Whitehorse to redirect the entry/exit point off of Hamilton Blvd. and position the entering point close to the intersection of Sumanik Dr. and Hamilton Blvd. This would allow ski club vehicle drivers to use the traffic lights to cross Hamiton Blvd. safely. Mind you, the entry would have to be close to the turning lane as possible, giving as much distance between the bottom of the hill and oncoming downhill traffic coming from Mount Mac. Recreation Centre. I would appreciate an acknowledgement or a reply to my concerns at the email address donaldgraham286@gmail.com on Facebook Share Hamilton Boulevard is a speed zone from Sumanik Dr. to McIntyre Dr. and beyond [I didn't know this, at least before my accident]. This was reported in the Whitehorse Star newspaper, on Mar. 23, 2022. An RCMP report stated that a total of 55 tickets were issued with two drivers exceeding 100 km/h in the 60 km/h zone. I was unfortunately in a car accident in mid-January on that same stretch of Hamilton Blvd. The reason I think these drivers exhibit these high rates of speed in this location is that there are no visible buildings or houses in the vicinity and it is just like a normal highway where nobody would travel at 60 km/hr. Furthermore, there is no traffic coming in the opposite direction as the boulevard is divided. Pretty tempting if you are in a hurry and nobody is coming from your rear. Think like a speeder. No, the only way you could slow these drivers down is to get really tough with them. Maybe put in a radar site with a photo camera, to ticket the speeders and automatically send them a bill for their infringement, like they do in Vancouver. This may not work here in the Yukon as our license plates are attached to the rear of our vehicle and are not visible due to being covered in snow or mud. If like other provinces and territories they have a front-mounted license plate in the front, this might be possible. Otherwise, put a radar detector which they have done on occasions, to tell the driver what speed they are doing and maybe they might slow down. Again, If not the RCMP could make more effort to increase their presents near this location and set up their trap. It would be a money-maker for sure. With the help of volunteers, the proceeds could go to some local charity. Or the money could go to equipment to support the RCMP's quest to make the roads safer for pedestrians, bicyclers and drivers. There are a lot of XC skiers driving out of the Dog Trail parking lot, as I did, who wish to go North and have to turn right [south] on Hamilton Blvd at McIntyre Dr. We do a U-turn and come back to the stop sign on McIntyre and Hamilton to proceed across to merge with traffic going North on Hamilton. The other option is to do a left-hand turn off of Hamilton in the turning lane going South [this was not available at the time of my accident as it was not plowed out for a number of days by the City's crews due to the high snow fall] and proceed across the boulevard and enter the merging lane going North. This is an extremely dangerous maneuver as the turn is too sharp and you have to back up to make the turn, which I did, resulting in a near-fatal accident with a speeder coming on Hamilton going South. The best way to solve this too-sharp of a turn is to eliminate the left-hand turning lane altogether, going South on Hamilton. This would force drivers to not attempt this dangerous route which was one of the causes of my accident. The other was the pile-up of snow on the intersection by the City's snow removal equipment which blocked the view for drivers altogether. I was told by my daughter and skiers, this excess snow was not removed for four days after my accident. Are there any thoughts about improving this intersection ? I have heard eventually it will become a normal intersection with traffic lights when housing lots are opened up across the boulevard. I have suggested to the Whitehorse XC Ski Club, which I am a member, that they should approach the City of Whitehorse to redirect the entry/exit point off of Hamilton Blvd. and position the entering point close to the intersection of Sumanik Dr. and Hamilton Blvd. This would allow ski club vehicle drivers to use the traffic lights to cross Hamiton Blvd. safely. Mind you, the entry would have to be close to the turning lane as possible, giving as much distance between the bottom of the hill and oncoming downhill traffic coming from Mount Mac. Recreation Centre. I would appreciate an acknowledgement or a reply to my concerns at the email address donaldgraham286@gmail.com on Twitter Share Hamilton Boulevard is a speed zone from Sumanik Dr. to McIntyre Dr. and beyond [I didn't know this, at least before my accident]. This was reported in the Whitehorse Star newspaper, on Mar. 23, 2022. An RCMP report stated that a total of 55 tickets were issued with two drivers exceeding 100 km/h in the 60 km/h zone. I was unfortunately in a car accident in mid-January on that same stretch of Hamilton Blvd. The reason I think these drivers exhibit these high rates of speed in this location is that there are no visible buildings or houses in the vicinity and it is just like a normal highway where nobody would travel at 60 km/hr. Furthermore, there is no traffic coming in the opposite direction as the boulevard is divided. Pretty tempting if you are in a hurry and nobody is coming from your rear. Think like a speeder. No, the only way you could slow these drivers down is to get really tough with them. Maybe put in a radar site with a photo camera, to ticket the speeders and automatically send them a bill for their infringement, like they do in Vancouver. This may not work here in the Yukon as our license plates are attached to the rear of our vehicle and are not visible due to being covered in snow or mud. If like other provinces and territories they have a front-mounted license plate in the front, this might be possible. Otherwise, put a radar detector which they have done on occasions, to tell the driver what speed they are doing and maybe they might slow down. Again, If not the RCMP could make more effort to increase their presents near this location and set up their trap. It would be a money-maker for sure. With the help of volunteers, the proceeds could go to some local charity. Or the money could go to equipment to support the RCMP's quest to make the roads safer for pedestrians, bicyclers and drivers. There are a lot of XC skiers driving out of the Dog Trail parking lot, as I did, who wish to go North and have to turn right [south] on Hamilton Blvd at McIntyre Dr. We do a U-turn and come back to the stop sign on McIntyre and Hamilton to proceed across to merge with traffic going North on Hamilton. The other option is to do a left-hand turn off of Hamilton in the turning lane going South [this was not available at the time of my accident as it was not plowed out for a number of days by the City's crews due to the high snow fall] and proceed across the boulevard and enter the merging lane going North. This is an extremely dangerous maneuver as the turn is too sharp and you have to back up to make the turn, which I did, resulting in a near-fatal accident with a speeder coming on Hamilton going South. The best way to solve this too-sharp of a turn is to eliminate the left-hand turning lane altogether, going South on Hamilton. This would force drivers to not attempt this dangerous route which was one of the causes of my accident. The other was the pile-up of snow on the intersection by the City's snow removal equipment which blocked the view for drivers altogether. I was told by my daughter and skiers, this excess snow was not removed for four days after my accident. Are there any thoughts about improving this intersection ? I have heard eventually it will become a normal intersection with traffic lights when housing lots are opened up across the boulevard. I have suggested to the Whitehorse XC Ski Club, which I am a member, that they should approach the City of Whitehorse to redirect the entry/exit point off of Hamilton Blvd. and position the entering point close to the intersection of Sumanik Dr. and Hamilton Blvd. This would allow ski club vehicle drivers to use the traffic lights to cross Hamiton Blvd. safely. Mind you, the entry would have to be close to the turning lane as possible, giving as much distance between the bottom of the hill and oncoming downhill traffic coming from Mount Mac. Recreation Centre. I would appreciate an acknowledgement or a reply to my concerns at the email address donaldgraham286@gmail.com on Linkedin Email Hamilton Boulevard is a speed zone from Sumanik Dr. to McIntyre Dr. and beyond [I didn't know this, at least before my accident]. This was reported in the Whitehorse Star newspaper, on Mar. 23, 2022. An RCMP report stated that a total of 55 tickets were issued with two drivers exceeding 100 km/h in the 60 km/h zone. I was unfortunately in a car accident in mid-January on that same stretch of Hamilton Blvd. The reason I think these drivers exhibit these high rates of speed in this location is that there are no visible buildings or houses in the vicinity and it is just like a normal highway where nobody would travel at 60 km/hr. Furthermore, there is no traffic coming in the opposite direction as the boulevard is divided. Pretty tempting if you are in a hurry and nobody is coming from your rear. Think like a speeder. No, the only way you could slow these drivers down is to get really tough with them. Maybe put in a radar site with a photo camera, to ticket the speeders and automatically send them a bill for their infringement, like they do in Vancouver. This may not work here in the Yukon as our license plates are attached to the rear of our vehicle and are not visible due to being covered in snow or mud. If like other provinces and territories they have a front-mounted license plate in the front, this might be possible. Otherwise, put a radar detector which they have done on occasions, to tell the driver what speed they are doing and maybe they might slow down. Again, If not the RCMP could make more effort to increase their presents near this location and set up their trap. It would be a money-maker for sure. With the help of volunteers, the proceeds could go to some local charity. Or the money could go to equipment to support the RCMP's quest to make the roads safer for pedestrians, bicyclers and drivers. There are a lot of XC skiers driving out of the Dog Trail parking lot, as I did, who wish to go North and have to turn right [south] on Hamilton Blvd at McIntyre Dr. We do a U-turn and come back to the stop sign on McIntyre and Hamilton to proceed across to merge with traffic going North on Hamilton. The other option is to do a left-hand turn off of Hamilton in the turning lane going South [this was not available at the time of my accident as it was not plowed out for a number of days by the City's crews due to the high snow fall] and proceed across the boulevard and enter the merging lane going North. This is an extremely dangerous maneuver as the turn is too sharp and you have to back up to make the turn, which I did, resulting in a near-fatal accident with a speeder coming on Hamilton going South. The best way to solve this too-sharp of a turn is to eliminate the left-hand turning lane altogether, going South on Hamilton. This would force drivers to not attempt this dangerous route which was one of the causes of my accident. The other was the pile-up of snow on the intersection by the City's snow removal equipment which blocked the view for drivers altogether. I was told by my daughter and skiers, this excess snow was not removed for four days after my accident. Are there any thoughts about improving this intersection ? I have heard eventually it will become a normal intersection with traffic lights when housing lots are opened up across the boulevard. I have suggested to the Whitehorse XC Ski Club, which I am a member, that they should approach the City of Whitehorse to redirect the entry/exit point off of Hamilton Blvd. and position the entering point close to the intersection of Sumanik Dr. and Hamilton Blvd. This would allow ski club vehicle drivers to use the traffic lights to cross Hamiton Blvd. safely. Mind you, the entry would have to be close to the turning lane as possible, giving as much distance between the bottom of the hill and oncoming downhill traffic coming from Mount Mac. Recreation Centre. I would appreciate an acknowledgement or a reply to my concerns at the email address donaldgraham286@gmail.com link

    Hamilton Boulevard is a speed zone from Sumanik Dr. to McIntyre Dr. and beyond [I didn't know this, at least before my accident]. This was reported in the Whitehorse Star newspaper, on Mar. 23, 2022. An RCMP report stated that a total of 55 tickets were issued with two drivers exceeding 100 km/h in the 60 km/h zone. I was unfortunately in a car accident in mid-January on that same stretch of Hamilton Blvd. The reason I think these drivers exhibit these high rates of speed in this location is that there are no visible buildings or houses in the vicinity and it is just like a normal highway where nobody would travel at 60 km/hr. Furthermore, there is no traffic coming in the opposite direction as the boulevard is divided. Pretty tempting if you are in a hurry and nobody is coming from your rear. Think like a speeder. No, the only way you could slow these drivers down is to get really tough with them. Maybe put in a radar site with a photo camera, to ticket the speeders and automatically send them a bill for their infringement, like they do in Vancouver. This may not work here in the Yukon as our license plates are attached to the rear of our vehicle and are not visible due to being covered in snow or mud. If like other provinces and territories they have a front-mounted license plate in the front, this might be possible. Otherwise, put a radar detector which they have done on occasions, to tell the driver what speed they are doing and maybe they might slow down. Again, If not the RCMP could make more effort to increase their presents near this location and set up their trap. It would be a money-maker for sure. With the help of volunteers, the proceeds could go to some local charity. Or the money could go to equipment to support the RCMP's quest to make the roads safer for pedestrians, bicyclers and drivers. There are a lot of XC skiers driving out of the Dog Trail parking lot, as I did, who wish to go North and have to turn right [south] on Hamilton Blvd at McIntyre Dr. We do a U-turn and come back to the stop sign on McIntyre and Hamilton to proceed across to merge with traffic going North on Hamilton. The other option is to do a left-hand turn off of Hamilton in the turning lane going South [this was not available at the time of my accident as it was not plowed out for a number of days by the City's crews due to the high snow fall] and proceed across the boulevard and enter the merging lane going North. This is an extremely dangerous maneuver as the turn is too sharp and you have to back up to make the turn, which I did, resulting in a near-fatal accident with a speeder coming on Hamilton going South. The best way to solve this too-sharp of a turn is to eliminate the left-hand turning lane altogether, going South on Hamilton. This would force drivers to not attempt this dangerous route which was one of the causes of my accident. The other was the pile-up of snow on the intersection by the City's snow removal equipment which blocked the view for drivers altogether. I was told by my daughter and skiers, this excess snow was not removed for four days after my accident. Are there any thoughts about improving this intersection ? I have heard eventually it will become a normal intersection with traffic lights when housing lots are opened up across the boulevard. I have suggested to the Whitehorse XC Ski Club, which I am a member, that they should approach the City of Whitehorse to redirect the entry/exit point off of Hamilton Blvd. and position the entering point close to the intersection of Sumanik Dr. and Hamilton Blvd. This would allow ski club vehicle drivers to use the traffic lights to cross Hamiton Blvd. safely. Mind you, the entry would have to be close to the turning lane as possible, giving as much distance between the bottom of the hill and oncoming downhill traffic coming from Mount Mac. Recreation Centre. I would appreciate an acknowledgement or a reply to my concerns at the email address donaldgraham286@gmail.com

    Old Skier asked over 1 year ago

    Hi Old Skier,

    Thank you for sharing your comments and concerns regarding road safety along Hamilton Boulevard and in the City broadly. I want to acknowledge that we have received your comments and concerns and I am sorry to learn about your collision in this area.

    Our team consulted with stakeholders, interested parties, and community last year on what the major issues and opportunities in our transportation network. We heard many comments and concerns regarding road safety for all road users including pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, and drivers. Based on the feedback we received (see Phase 1 Engagement Summary Report), it became readily apparent that road safety is a major issue among residents and a key theme (among others) and area of focus for our Transportation Master Plan.

    Road safety is influenced by a variety of factors including policy, engineering design, enforcement, and education and the City does have a variety of tools available, within its jurisdiction and control, to influence road safety. For reference, the City has administration and jurisdiction over roads, sidewalks, crosswalks, street signage, traffic signals, etc. within City limits. The City, however, has limited jurisdiction over motor vehicle regulations (Motor Vehicle Act, Yukon Government), vehicle standards and safety devices (Federal Government), enforcement of moving traffic (RCMP), among other things that also have an impact on road safety. Under the current Motor Vehicle Act (currently under review by the Yukon Government), the City does not have the authority to implemented automated speed enforcement or red-light cameras and would require a revision to the Motor Vehicle Act.

    Through the Transportation Master Plan, we are identifying ways that we can work towards developing an accessible, equitable, safe, and sustainable transportation network that are directly within the City's control. We will also be identifying opportunities for the City to partner with other levels of government in achieving our collective transportation vision, values, and goals.

    We have recently posted a discussion forum on improving road safety. I encourage you to check it out and provide your input.

    Cheers,

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T.
    Project Manager, Transportation Master Plan
    Engineering Services, City of Whitehorse

  • Share The top of Two Mile Hill and Range Road! The two new buildings and the proposed (by all accounts a huge expansion) new Arena. Where are all the cars going to go! What planning with respect to cats is being done?! Shouldn’t the Arena be in a place where there is more space? on Facebook Share The top of Two Mile Hill and Range Road! The two new buildings and the proposed (by all accounts a huge expansion) new Arena. Where are all the cars going to go! What planning with respect to cats is being done?! Shouldn’t the Arena be in a place where there is more space? on Twitter Share The top of Two Mile Hill and Range Road! The two new buildings and the proposed (by all accounts a huge expansion) new Arena. Where are all the cars going to go! What planning with respect to cats is being done?! Shouldn’t the Arena be in a place where there is more space? on Linkedin Email The top of Two Mile Hill and Range Road! The two new buildings and the proposed (by all accounts a huge expansion) new Arena. Where are all the cars going to go! What planning with respect to cats is being done?! Shouldn’t the Arena be in a place where there is more space? link

    The top of Two Mile Hill and Range Road! The two new buildings and the proposed (by all accounts a huge expansion) new Arena. Where are all the cars going to go! What planning with respect to cats is being done?! Shouldn’t the Arena be in a place where there is more space?

    YukonDaisy asked over 1 year ago

    Hi YukonDaisy,

    Thank you for your question.

    As part of preparation for the Canada Winter Games bid package, bid committee determined that demolition and upgrades of the existing Takhini Arena at the existing Takhini Arena site was the most reasonable and feasible option to accommodate the needs of the community and the games. As part of this process, a Transportation Impact Assessment was conducted which identified on-site transportation measures to accommodate people accessing the site such as transit, bicycle parking, on-site parking, etc.

    With respect to Range Road and Two Mile Hill Road, the City has carried out multiple planning processes to determine what should be done to accommodate the needs of the intersection and corridor. Through the Range Road Corridor Study, it was determined that a bi-directional cycling facility on the west side would be beneficial to encourage more sustainable transportation choices along the corridor. Through the Range Road & Two Mile Hill Intersection Study, it was determined that intersection upgrades and signal timing improvements are required to improve roadway geometry, enhance road safety, enhance active transportation facilities, and accommodate the anticipated growth in traffic.

    We will be reviewing all of these proposed improvements and other transportation network level requirements as part of the Transportation Master Plan.

    Cheers,

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T. | Engineering Services

  • Share We all together need to reduce emissions drastically in the period covered by the Transportation Master Plan, so imagine quantifying emission reductions will be an important part of its development. Question: will the Transportation Master Plan quantify transportation-related emissions and expected emission reductions from the various measures that will be proposed, and will these expected emission reductions be compared to national and territorial emission reduction goals? on Facebook Share We all together need to reduce emissions drastically in the period covered by the Transportation Master Plan, so imagine quantifying emission reductions will be an important part of its development. Question: will the Transportation Master Plan quantify transportation-related emissions and expected emission reductions from the various measures that will be proposed, and will these expected emission reductions be compared to national and territorial emission reduction goals? on Twitter Share We all together need to reduce emissions drastically in the period covered by the Transportation Master Plan, so imagine quantifying emission reductions will be an important part of its development. Question: will the Transportation Master Plan quantify transportation-related emissions and expected emission reductions from the various measures that will be proposed, and will these expected emission reductions be compared to national and territorial emission reduction goals? on Linkedin Email We all together need to reduce emissions drastically in the period covered by the Transportation Master Plan, so imagine quantifying emission reductions will be an important part of its development. Question: will the Transportation Master Plan quantify transportation-related emissions and expected emission reductions from the various measures that will be proposed, and will these expected emission reductions be compared to national and territorial emission reduction goals? link

    We all together need to reduce emissions drastically in the period covered by the Transportation Master Plan, so imagine quantifying emission reductions will be an important part of its development. Question: will the Transportation Master Plan quantify transportation-related emissions and expected emission reductions from the various measures that will be proposed, and will these expected emission reductions be compared to national and territorial emission reduction goals?

    freeform99 asked over 2 years ago

    There are two considerations for GHG emissions reductions that need to be considered here: project-specific GHG emissions associated with transportation capital project implementation and broad city-wide GHG emissions associated with transportation use.

    Project-specific GHG emissions
    Measurement of GHG emissions associated with a project is not difficult nor cost-prohibitive to perform. These GHG measurements include quantification of GHG associated with capital project implementation. For example: labour and materials associated with concrete, gravel, and asphalt works in transportation projects.

    Each year, the City prepares a capital expenditure plan for the following years. This plan outlines the capital priorities for the City. Projects that are proposed as part of the capital expenditure plan are ranked with both corporate and community GHG emission reductions targets in mind, where projects that result in an increase in GHG emissions are negatively scored. The capital expenditure plan also considers other benefits and costs of proposed projects such as economic and societal considerations.

    City-wide GHG emissions

    Measurement of City-wide sustainability performance in transportation could be measured by mode share mode share. While mode share is an indicator of the percentage of use of a mode of transportation such as walking, cycling, transit, and driving, it only gives us a proxy for representation of community GHG emissions from transportation.

    It is technically difficult to measure both GHG emissions reduction and mode share change as a result of transportation improvements as it requires a detailed analysis on behaviour change. This process has many assumptions associated with it.

    The City has proposed development of a Community Emissions Inventory as part of the 2022-2026 Capital Expenditures Plan which seeks to fill in the gaps on GHG emmissions. Please note that this project is ultimately subject to Mayor and Council approval. 

    Transportation Master Plan

    The Transportation Master Plan seeks to provide a strategy for how the City invests in its transportation infrastructure in the short, medium, and long term horizons that considers relative benefit to cost and society, economy, and the environment. In essence, this plan intends to provide a list of “pre-screened” projects that inform the capital expenditure planning process.

    As part of this Transportation Master Plan, the City will be checking in with our previous targets and targets proposed by international, national, and terroritorial agencies. It is anticipated that projects ultimately proposed as part of this plan will likely (depending on what we ultimately hear from the public and weighed against other environmental, social, and economic considerations) feature sustainability considerations.

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T. | Engineering Services
    Sara Thompson | Planning and Sustinability Services

  • Share I am on the board for my neighbourhood association, and would like to find a way to solicit feedback from neighbourhood residents so that the association can fill out the survey for organizations. Would it be possible to see the complete list of questions in the survey for organizations before actually filling it out, in order to know what kind of feedback to get from residents? And is there any other support the TMP team can offer to small organizations trying to collect feedback from our members? on Facebook Share I am on the board for my neighbourhood association, and would like to find a way to solicit feedback from neighbourhood residents so that the association can fill out the survey for organizations. Would it be possible to see the complete list of questions in the survey for organizations before actually filling it out, in order to know what kind of feedback to get from residents? And is there any other support the TMP team can offer to small organizations trying to collect feedback from our members? on Twitter Share I am on the board for my neighbourhood association, and would like to find a way to solicit feedback from neighbourhood residents so that the association can fill out the survey for organizations. Would it be possible to see the complete list of questions in the survey for organizations before actually filling it out, in order to know what kind of feedback to get from residents? And is there any other support the TMP team can offer to small organizations trying to collect feedback from our members? on Linkedin Email I am on the board for my neighbourhood association, and would like to find a way to solicit feedback from neighbourhood residents so that the association can fill out the survey for organizations. Would it be possible to see the complete list of questions in the survey for organizations before actually filling it out, in order to know what kind of feedback to get from residents? And is there any other support the TMP team can offer to small organizations trying to collect feedback from our members? link

    I am on the board for my neighbourhood association, and would like to find a way to solicit feedback from neighbourhood residents so that the association can fill out the survey for organizations. Would it be possible to see the complete list of questions in the survey for organizations before actually filling it out, in order to know what kind of feedback to get from residents? And is there any other support the TMP team can offer to small organizations trying to collect feedback from our members?

    RedBird53 asked over 2 years ago

    Hi RedBird53,

    Thank you for your question.

    I have now posted a preview of the survey so that you can solicit input from members of your organization. See Transportation Master Plan - Survey #1 (for Organizations) description (below) or at the following links. Please note that we prefer submissions through the online form.

    https://whitehorsetmp.ca/26725/widgets/110335/documents/71650

    https://whitehorsetmp.ca/embeds/projects/26725/survey-tools/25414

    I am unsure what "supports" that could be made available or that you could be referring to. Please get in touch with our project team to discuss further and suggest any ideas you think would be helpful.

    Stefan Baer, E.I.T.
    Transportation Engineer-in-Training | Engineering Services

Page last updated: 13 Mar 2024, 12:35 PM