Transportation Master Plan

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The Whitehorse Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is our long-term vision and strategy for transportation decision-making and investment over the next 20 years. The Transportation Master Plan guides how people and goods move around our city and sets our vision and priorities as a community in shaping a multi-modal transportation network. The TMP sets the direction for a vibrant city where people, goods, and places are conveniently connected by diverse transportation options and works towards developing a safe, equitable, and sustainable transportation network for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons.


Whitehorse has grown into a city of over 30,000 people. Over

The Whitehorse Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is our long-term vision and strategy for transportation decision-making and investment over the next 20 years. The Transportation Master Plan guides how people and goods move around our city and sets our vision and priorities as a community in shaping a multi-modal transportation network. The TMP sets the direction for a vibrant city where people, goods, and places are conveniently connected by diverse transportation options and works towards developing a safe, equitable, and sustainable transportation network for all ages, abilities, incomes, and seasons.


Whitehorse has grown into a city of over 30,000 people. Over the next 20 years Whitehorse is expected to grow to more than 40,000 people. With growth, we need to reevaluate how people and goods move throughout the City.

As we set the vision for our updated Transportation Master Plan, there are important decisions and meaningful discussions to be had as individuals and as a city towards developing and shaping an accessible, equitable, safe, and sustainable transportation network and ultimately a vibrant and livable Whitehorse. Transportation decisions affect us all. How people and goods move affects residents, businesses, and visitors alike whether you walk, cycle, take transit, drive, or ship products or have them delivered. All the choices we make moving forward will require some give and take, compromises, and tradeoffs.

The goal of the Whitehorse Transportation Master Plan is to establish our vision and priorities as a community in shaping a multi-modal transportation network through 2040. The plan aims to guide the City's strategic investment in transportation infrastructure and services across Whitehorse through 2040 with the goal of working towards an accessible, safe, equitable, and sustainable multi-modal transportation network.

Background

The City completed a major review of its transportation network with the completion of a 1992 Citywide Traffic Study and the subsequent 2004 City-Wide Transportation Study. The City had implemented many changes and new initiatives between the two large studies that fall under the broader category of general transportation issues. Accordingly, the 2004 study was progressive, for its time, in achieving a balanced multi-modal approach to the planning of the network. Alternative modes of transportation were considered and given more weight in the decision-making process than ever before through the identification and creation of pedestrian, cycling, and transit routes through the City, thus maintaining and enhancing the quality of life for Whitehorse citizens.

The City is responsible for all the roadways within the city boundaries, with the exception of the Alaska Highway and the North Klondike Highway, which are managed by the Government of Yukon - Department of Highways and Public Works. A number of significant studies and tasks are in progress or have been completed since the 2004 City-Wide Transportation Study. These include the following: The Transportation Demand Management Plan (2015), the Bicycle Network Plan (2018); Transit Master Plan (2018); Trail Plan (2020), numerous Area Development Studies; several new traffic signals; downtown parking studies; the development of the Whistle Bend subdivision; a new City Operations Building; plans for a new downtown City Services Building; and rapid development across the City. The City is currently developing studies that relate to the Transportation Master Plan, which are the Whitehorse 2040 Official Community Plan and the Transit Route Modernization Study. The Transportation Master Plan will build and integrate with these previous and existing planning processes and provided a unified and holistic approach for how we develop our transportation network.

Discussions: All (4) Open (4)
  • New Mobility

    3 months ago
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    What do you think about new mobility and the future of transportation? 

    How should Whitehorse prepare for new forms of mobility? What do you think Whitehorse can do to accommodate existing and future transportation technology?

    How do you think new mobility will help us meet our accessibility, equity, safety, and sustainability goals for our transportation network? Do you think it help or hinder us from achieving our goals and targets?


    Electric Vehicle Charging Station

    Overview

    Imagine a world in which the entire vehicle fleet was electric. How about a world where you could request an automated vehicle for hire. What if we started using jetpacks and flying around the place?

    The future of transportation is coming. In some ways, the future is already here and emerging. We have electric vehicles on our roads, our vehicles are becoming more connected and smarter. People are using e-mobility devices on our roadways, sidewalks, and pathways such as e-scooters and e-bikes. It is not necessarily a matter of if, but a matter of when and how we will welcome the future of transportation in Whitehorse.


    Lime E-bike Sharing in North Vancouver, BC

     

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  • Shared Streets

    3 months ago
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    Imagine creating streets that function more as places and destinations. Imagine streets that foster a sense of place, that people enjoy being, and are vibrant and lively. Imagine streets with street performers, music, restaurants with outdoor seating and patios. Pedestrians are first here. Fewer cars, lower speeds.

    What do you think about designing shared streets? Do you think this is something that could be implemented and customized for Whitehorse? Where? Why or why not?

    Shared Street on Stephen Avenue, Calgary, Alberta

    References and Resources

    CityGreen Urban Landscape Solutions (2020). The Rising Popularit of "The Woonerf Design": A Living Street Concept For Shared City Spaces. https://citygreen.com/the-rising-popularity-of-the-woonerf-design-a-living-street-concept-for-shared-city-spaces/

    National Association of City Transportation Officials (2013). Urban Street Design Guide - Commercial Alley. https://nacto.org/publication/urban-street-design-guide/streets/commercial-alley/

    National Association of City Transportation Officials (2013). Urban Street Design Guide - Commercial Shared Street. https://nacto.org/publication/urban-street-design-guide/streets/commercial-shared-street/

    National Association of City Transportation Officials (2013). Urban Street Design Guide - Residential Shared Street. https://nacto.org/publication/urban-street-design-guide/streets/residential-shared-street/

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  • Promoting Equity in Transportation

    4 months ago
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    How can we make our transportation network more welcoming, accessible, and inclusive for all road users?

    How can we promote equity, diversity, and inclusion in our transportation network? 

    How can we ensure that our transportation network accommodates the needs of vulnerable road users (children, older road users, people with disabilities, etc.)?

    What projects, policies, or programs should we do to promote equity in our transportation network?  

    Overview

    Imagine streets that are accessible to everyone throughout the year. Imagine streets that feel safe and comfortable regardless of your identity or abilities, and streets that feel safe and intuitive to all who call Whitehorse home.

    When we hear the word equity, we likely don't associate it with transportation. Yet, equity is very linked with the transportation network. We know that many people face significant barriers to using our transportation network. For those of us who are able-bodied (people without a disability), we may not be aware the many barriers in the transportation network. Examples of barriers in the transportation network include:

    • Location of pushbuttons
    • Cracks in sidewalks
    • Snow clearing on sidewalks and crosswalks
    • Lack of lighting on pathways
    • Obstructions, uneven terrain
    • Location of accessible parking

    To make our transportation network more accessible, we need to consider everyone's needs. We need to know how children, older road users, and people with disabilities, and everyone use our streets. Equity in transportation is more than pride crosswalks. Equity in transportation means safe, accessible, and comfortable spaces for people to move. Equity in transportation says 'You are welcome and you belong!' on our streets and in our city.

    References and Resources

    99% Invisible (April 27, 2021). Curb cuts. https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/curb-cuts/

    99% Invisible (July 23, 2019). Invisible Women. Invisible Women - 99% Invisible (99percentinvisible.org)

    City of Austin - Austin Vision Zero (May 10, 2021). Safe for All - Vision Zero's role in advancing racial equity in Austin. https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/4a57b61a0dc9444a9d117dc69f3a898e

    City of Oakland (August 22, 2019). OakDOT Kicks Off Three-Year, $100 Million, Equity-Focused Paving Plan. https://www.oaklandca.gov/news/2019/oakdot-kicks-off-three-year-100-million-equity-focused-paving-plan

    Kittleson & Associates. The Importance of the Equity Lens in Transportation Planning and Design. https://www.kittelson.com/ideas/the-importance-of-the-equity-lens-in-transportation-planning-and-design

    Social Sciences and Humaniities Research Council of Canada.(January 2022). Understanding and Responding to the Transit Needs of Women in Canada. finalreport.pdf (squarespace.com) 

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  • Improving Road Safety

    4 months ago
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    How can we work towards zero traffic-related injuries and fatalities on our streets?

    What engineering, education, or enforcement tools can we use to improve traffic safety?

    Do you think it is possible to work towards zero injuries and fatalities on our streets?

    Traditional Approach vs Vision Zero (Vision Zero Network, 2021)


    Overview

    Traffic related injuries and fatalities pose significant risks to public health in Canada and around the world. According to a report issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, the Yukon has the second-highest rate of traffic-related injuries and fatalities in Canada.

    Injuries and fatalities from traffic collisions can be debilitating and have life-altering consequences. These are tragic incidents for those involved, families, and communities.

    Jurisdictions around the world have been grappling with how to minimize and eliminate all traffic-related serious injuries and fatalities on streets and roads using a combination of engineering, education, and enforcement tools. A framework for minimizing or eliminating traffic related incidents is called Vision Zero.

    "At the heart of [Vision Zero] is the belief that no one should be killed or seriously injured from using the road network. [A Vision Zero framework acknowledges that]:

    • People make mistakes which can lead to crashes; however, no one should die or be seriously injured on the road as a result of these mistakes. 
    • The human body has a limited physical ability to tolerate crash forces – any impact greater than 30km/h increases the risk of dying significantly. 
    • Road safety is a shared responsibility amongst everyone, including those that design, build, operate and use the road system. 
    • All parts of the road system must be strengthened in combination to multiply the protective effects and if one part fails, the others will still protect people. 

    At the centre of the system is people – people that are fragile and will at times make mistakes that can lead to crashes. With that understanding, the road system needs to put layers of protection in the form of safe roads, vehicles, speeds, people around the fallible and vulnerable human in order to prevent deaths and serious injuries."

    (Towards Zero Foundation, 2021)

    References and Resources

    City of Austin (May 10, 2021). Vision Zerohttps://www.austintexas.gov/department/vision-zero

    Institute of Transporation Engineers. Safe System. https://www.ite.org/technical-resources/topics/safe-systems/

    iRAP (October 25, 2021). How safe roads feature in the Global Plan for Decade of Action. https://irap.org/2021/10/how-safe-roads-feature-in-global-plan-for-decade-of-action/

    Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (2020). Motor Vehicles in Yukon: A Public Health Perspective. https://yukon.ca/sites/yukon.ca/files/hss/hss-imgs/yukon_cmoh_motor_vehicle_report_2019_web.pdf

    SWOV (2018). Susainable Safety 3rd Edition. https://www.swov.nl/publicatie/sustainable-safety-3rd-edition-advanced-vision-2018-2030

    Towards Zero Foundation (2021). The Safe System. http://www.towardszerofoundation.org/thesafesystem/

    Vision Zero Network. What is Vision Zero? https://visionzeronetwork.org/about/what-is-vision-zero/

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Page last updated: 22 Mar 2023, 05:02 PM